Air heating is working

Tuesday August 15

The day started by sanding down the rust sport, created by the little ‘kernel’ or rust removed by the perago disk who flew around and landed on the deck.  They left a little rust spots sanded pilot house front deck.  I should have wiped/ hosed the deck after I remove the rust …………After the sanding I applied a coat of primer which had Owatrol added to it.  Owatrol converts rust and is a rust inhibitor.   The primer was dry in 20 odd minutes.

2 Kabola technicians came to assist Ron with the hot air unit.  The Temperature indicator showed an ambient temperature of 1C.    These technicians, did discover that one thermocouple should have been mounted factory wise was not.  So they needed a 7 mm drill and a pair of pliers, to make sure the drill would not go too far and puncture the heat exchanger.  The next problem …the 1C measurement was caused because the plug was not in deep enough.  And yes the heating worked smoothly and quietly.  We discussed how to optimally control it, and it was decided that the wall controller would control the furnace on and off, and the blower would be set on automatic and the temperature.  This way the fan will adjust its speed to the temperature of the outside thermocouple, and be very quiet.

Lindy and Roy coming, but are having delays with trains

Once Roy got into designing the frame for the switches, Lindy and I applied a coat of yellow on the top deck which I had just sanded and primed

While we Lindy and I were painting, Deb decided Lindy needs to make some art on the main hatch, which would be fun to look at, and on the hatch it can be ‘framed, and people will not really walk much over it.

deck_hatch

Here you can see how Deb was trained by the swans.  They would gently float up, see that the window was open and make noise, Deb then dutifully would grab the lets over bread, feed them, at first by just throwing small pieces out the window, and later by holding it in her hand and the swans just picking it out.  Just like she did when were in France on Waterman

Roy and Lindy had to leave around 18:30, because of train troubles it would be a longer.  Because it was still light we drove to Wijk aan Zee for a walk on the beach and some food.  In this place you went in, ordered paid and they would bring it out.  So I quickly ordered 2 fun beers, a portion Sateh and a portion bitterballen.  I got my 2 beers and our number to be displayed on the table.   The Sateh came out….and no sign of the bitterballen, the chef apologized and said they would come out very quickly now.  We nibbled on the Sateh…and . 20 minutes later our beers were finished and still no bitterballen.    I went inside and smilingly explained and after excuses of the manager I exchanged the number for the price of the bitterballen.

While walking to the car, we saw this Abri ( Shelter in French) which was a sea shell on its side made in 1993.  Deb sat on the little bench and the sound was amazing, it really amplified the sea sounds

 

Hot water how long before it is hot?

We have a Vetus WH 45 ( or 31) hot water heater (boiler, clarifier). The heating lament has a built in thermostat.  It is also heard by the engine when it is running.

The temperature should be kept above 60 C, so we won’t get legionairs disease.
When he engine heats up the water it gets to 80 C.

The  boiler is located on the front port side of the engine room, from there it is piped to the hull of the boat and then forward to the shower.  the pipe is 16 mm brass, and the distance from the boiler is about 3.5 – 4 Meters.  So with a diameter of 16 mm the volume of 1 meter pipe is  0.8 * 0.8 * 3.14 * 100 = >200 cm3, so 3.5 Meter is about 700 cm3.    1 liter is 1,000 cm3, so the amount of cold water which has to flow through the pipe is less than 1 liter.  Which is not a big loss.  Some boats have the hot water circulating always so there is never a ‘cold’ moment and los of hot water.    But ‘wasting’ less than a liter of water with a shower, is costing less energy than constantly having the warm water flow in a loop.

With the new Central heating unit, we wil select a model which provides CV heat and Hot water.  We could get rid of the Vetus, but why get rid of it when it is still good? there is enough space.   We have a few options.
1.   we use a T valve.  use the Vetus when warm and the CV furnace the rest of the time
2.  We plumb the Vetus > Cv furnace  > hot water line
we can start with this layout…( courtesy of Pete Milne Quo Vadis 24 M Hagenaar)

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And later

 

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Links to these parts.

www.titanproducts.com/strap-on-temperature-sensor.html
www.titanproducts.com/single-and-two-stage-thermostats.html (TPES1/90/24)

Heating

 Some calculations about heating.

The barge is divided in 4 spaces.

  1. Front Locker (with water)    3*2 *1  = 6 M3
  2. Main Living space, with the bathroom area   10 * 3 * 2  = 60 M( and bathroom area  1* 3 * 2 = 6M3)
  3. Pilot House   3.82* 2.23* 2  = 17 M3
  4. Rear Cabin   ( once converted ) 3 * 2.5 * 1.8  = 13.5 M3

There are a lot of opinions on how much energy is needed to heat the space.  Googling and asking installers for quotes.  Some put extra weight in measuring the windows, others just measure the size of the cabin, and each has a different multiplier.    http://www.calculator.net/btu-calculator.html.  Ron the heating guy, living close to the Marina in Zaandam  throws out 70 W per M3.  Hornbach suggests 100 W/m3

Now the Pilot is drafty, and needs to be sealed.
There is a door between the pilot house and the main living space, so that can be closed off, otherwise all the heat escapes to there.

Maritme booster offered a mini solo II for 17KW  @5485
Kabola offered 13,500 KW  a KB 40 @6573  @ 4 working days

Amsterdam average temp January 37 F (3C)   lowest 20 F  -6C
Warming 30 C (  -10 – >20)    ( 14F -> 68)

For the living room I come up with
Using http://www.calculator.net/btu-calculator.html I see 5.5 KW
Using Ron’s rule of tumb I come up with 4.2  ( Hornbach = 6 KW)
So safe to say 6 KW

The bathroom is already in that calculation, but we will ad a radiator which can warm towels (thermostat on radiator, plus it has to be ‘verzinkt’ so it can be better in humid conditions)

The frontlocker, uninsulated will just get one small radiator, to prevent he water from freezing 2 *3.4 *1 *.5 ( l*w*h*slope) 3.4 M3 (frost free thermostat on radiator 200 watt?)

The pilot house 1.5 KW  (thermostat on radiator) ( Hornbach =1.7 Kw) (frost free thermostat on radiator)

Rear Bedroom  1 KW   so we need a total of over 9 KW  so a 13-17 KW heater is sufficient (frost free thermostat on radiator)

Now space….we have  3 windows 90 cm wide  100 CM high so we can place 3 * 80 * 60 radiators  ( 2 windows are in the walk path, s we need to keep thin ones there, one window is in the string area, so we can use a double one there)
PLUS we need to put a radiator close to the front opening

radiatoren2.png

The radiators will have to have bottom connections, then we can use a shut of valve so we can remove a radiator when it gets bad.
The system has to be filled with coolant, to prevent freezing, since the boat is not being used year round.

Larger

Type 11   7 cm
Type 21   8 cm
Type22  11 cm
Type 33 16 cm

There are many discount radiator places. Some of the radiators I saw at https://www.cvtotaal.nl

Brugman Kompakt 4 Type 11 L800 H500   814 watt     ( about E50)
Brugman Kompakt 4 Type 21s L800 H500   1100 watt   ( about E 66)
Brugman Kompakt 4 Type 22 L800 H500   1474 watt   ( about E 90)
Brugman Kompakt 4 Type 33 L800 H500   2080 watt   ( about E 120)

with 3 windows we get 3 * 1474   =  4450 watt ad another in the front for 600 Watt. We can add one behind the sofa 1100 watt  and we are at 5500

Since we are modifying the wall behind the bed we could put a radiator here.   about 40 cm high, but it can be 160 cm long  (800 – 1000 watt)
Now not sure how we do the on/off behind bed…….

Now that could suffice, but we want safety…but we are out of places…so we can use ‘plint verwarming’a small heat exchanger with a fan under cabinets (sofa).  A kickspace.
https://www.remeha.nl
They can generate between 700 -1200 Watt   50 cm wide 10 cm high  they are a tad more expensive E350
But we can mount one in the kitchen and one in the sofa, and only turn them on when it really gets freezing.  The water has to be over 50C in order to turn on…….( but it looks like if you put it in summer setting it will always flow)
another extra option is a Webasto air blower  Madera 4 or 8  between E 200 – E500
(https://www.svb24.com/en/webasto-heat-exchanger-with-heater-fan.html)

In the bathroom we will put a small towel radiator, now why not do the same on the other side.   (one problem the left side is ‘covered’ by the door to the pilot house and the right used..the wall is storing the sliding bathroom door)

For the pilot house we will use one radiator and a kickspace

The lines out for the wall have to be spaced 5 cm from each other

A few weeks later,  having had more idle time on my hand I was able to create a spread sheet with more dimensions and sizes, and run a bunch of scenarios coming up with what seems to be a very good mix.   We want to keep the radiators on one hand as ‘thin’ as possible.  The size does not really matter much since it is just a curved wall, which along we walk.   So lets make the sizes a bit larger and then we can make the radiators a size thinner.
So now the thinking goes to   either of these .  each about 8700 W
Port side 700 * 900 size 22 -21-22  (2100-1700-2100)
Bed 500 * 1200 size 21 (1750)
Next to the sofa and behind the washer 700 * 500 size 22 (1200)

Or
Port side 600 * 900 size 22 -21-22 (2000-1500-2000)
Bed 500 * 1200 size 21 .  (1750)
Next to the sofa and behind the washer 700 * 500 size 33 . (1700)

Well Ron came on Wednesday, while we were modifying the layout.  And looking to placing etc, he was quite adamant about using size 11 radiators.  3 on the port side, which each will be around 900 Watt, putting radiators above the bed and behind the sofa , was a non-no, so we opted for the radiator unit blowing hot air out of 3 outlets which would give us 2 KW,    So Friday 28th we started on the starboard side laying the lines, and making sure the T was approx 5 cm from each other.  Marc kept being puzzled about the 5 cm, until he used the hydraulic unit to put the clamps on , and the opening is ….just less than 5 cm.

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Wall opened up for the lines

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We opened the walls also in the shower area, just so we could get the lines through

port_wall_end1

Here Marius and Marc are putting the last wall plate back, and leaving a extra connection on the port side for a radiator

The walls are made of thin poplar multiplex, so Ron suggested some ‘butterfly’ inserts where a bolt with phillips head can go-in.  Because the electric and water and cv lines are hidden.

The first radiator installed, and Ron is explaining to Mark how the connections work.

Here you see Mark making the connection to the last radiator.
Unfortunately Marius had installed the wrong panels when these two were cutting the holes through the wood, so the holes were not under the center of the first window, but by using the most right connections the radiator was hanging nicely in the center of the bed, and far enough back to have a good landing place from the steps.

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Here is the end result

The day before we were leaving Ron came aboard to discuss the final install.    There we learned that the thermostat needed 4 wires,  and “why did you not install the hot air unit more complete and oh it also needed 2 wires”cv_thermostat_line

We had pulled with great effort 2 wires from the port side of the wheel house through a steel wall to the steps, through wood and steel to the living room, then removed the ceiling panels to pull the wires above the ceiling panels that way so they would not be visible.    We had made the trough holes as small as possible, so we had to gently chisel them larger, without cutting/damaging the first 2 wires we pulled.   And we had to add the 2 extra lines for the hot air unit.  So a total of 4 wires.  (IF IF we had known this before we would have pulled one round wire with 6 signal wires in it)  We placed the thermostat on the side of the white cup board and decided to just pull the extra set of wies down to the the bilge, lead them under the floor to the sofa and bring them up from there.

 

 

cv_sofa_air_unit.jpg

Here is the part of the sofa that houses the hot air unit.  On the side of the sofa there are 2 little sensors, one mounted high and the other low.  They have not been put in place because we could not find the correct nails/screws yet.

 

cv_hot_air_done

 

The blower unit is mounted on top of a tilted piece of ply wood on top of the neopreen rubber with zip ties, to minimize vibration.  To the left there is a control unit and the 24 V DC supply.

A sofa

What is always lacking in a boat……..storage….so instead of buying a sofa, or a sleeper sofa we decide to build one ourself.  Wide enough to have 2 sleeping places, roomy enough to store a lot of stuff.  The commercial ones available are never as optimal as we could do it ourself.

Initially we were thinking of making it a 2 person bed, 200 X 200 cm, just like they have in campers and boats where in the dining area, the table drops down. Being L shaped it just became too too much of a hassle.

A few points…
Being a tad older, the sofa should be at a height that is easy to sit down or stand up.
The sofa will be against the ‘bedroom divider’ and one wall.
The bedroom divider is 100 cm high (above that we have to ‘open’ divider’)
There has to be space of some heating otherwise there is NO heating on that side of boat, most likely it will be a hidden radiator in the back and a fan heat exchanger on the floor inside one side.
The boat is 300 cm from side to side on the floor, but  320 cm at 92 cm high,
So the back of the wall one side needs to be sloped.sofa.png

 

 

 

So here is a drawing of the sofa.
(data in cm )

Later we wil make a sheet with the location and contents

 

 

A picture of it finished without cushions

there is a 10 cm space beween the wall and the sofa, so we can mount a radiator behind it for heat

 

 

 

With some pretend cushions here.

 .
 Here is the side profile with the wooden strip at 98 cm high
Heigth/dept measurements by Marius. So pretty flat, just like the outside.

wall1.png                   wall2.png

Now as for some fun, and accent lighting we can place LED strips ( 50 cm 5050 LED with milk white cover) on the bottom of the sofa, which can also act as night light.  We will do the same at the drawer/closets next to the bed.  On Ebay we found some built in LED dimmers (24V).

 

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1st May 21017
So the pillows came in and they fitted well, but it looks like the height size is without filling. We can deal with it later to add a colored stripe on it or so

Here are Wilma and Timmy.
sofa_wilma.JPG